Catherine Cheek

Catherine "Kater" Cheek is a writer and artist.

Most commented posts

  1. “Emily’s Fifth Birthday” and “Alternative Medicine” — 16 comments
  2. Seeing Things, Part 1: The Big Idea — 10 comments
  3. Seeing Things, Part 8: First cover mockups — 10 comments
  4. Seeing Things, Part 11: paper books and cover design fallout — 9 comments
  5. First Stained Glass Panel — 8 comments

Author's posts

Dec 03

Book Review: Born a Crime

Born a Crime: Stories From a South African Childhood by Trevor Noah This is one of the most interesting memoirs I have ever listened to. I’m glad I listened to it instead of reading it, because Noah says a few things in other languages that I wouldn’t have been able to pronounce in my head. …

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Dec 03

Book Review: Blood of Tyrants

Blood of Tyrants by Naomi Novik I listened to or read all the rest of these books and somehow skipped over this one, so I was glad to see what happened in the interim. I didn’t know who Junichiro was, for example, and missed how Temeraire and Izkierka came to have an egg and why …

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Nov 19

Book Review: Braving the Wilderness

Braving the Wilderness: The quest for true belonging and the courage to stand alone by Brené Brown I think I’ve read all of Brene Brown’s books by now, and while they all start to run together, I think of them in aggregate as a “how to be a better human” required reading list. Or, listening, …

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Nov 12

Book Review: Stay With Me

Stay with Me by Ayọ̀bámi Adébáyọ̀ This is an amazingly well written book with deeply flawed characters who are in turn both understandable and detestable. My opinions on the characters changed so much over the course of the novel. It stars out when Yejide finds out her husband Akin has–against her wishes–taken a second wife. …

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Oct 31

Book Review: Small Great Things

Small Great Things by Jodi Picoult The cover says this is Picoult’s most important book. As Handle With Care was a book about raising a disabled child, this book could be titled “A White Person’s Guide to Racism.” Picoult is a very accessible author;. Reading her is like reading the novel equivalent of a mainstream …

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