Tag: sociology

Nov 08

Book Review: Daring Greatly

Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the Way We Live, Love, Parent, and Lead by BrenĂ© Brown Like many people, I watched Brene Brown’s TED talk and kind of put her in the category of woo-woo semi-spiritual women’s life coach, kind of like a one-note Elizabeth Gilbert. She’s more than that; she’s …

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Jul 21

Book Review: Devoured

Devoured: From Chicken Wings to Kale Smoothies–How What We Eat Defines Who We Are by Sophie Egan When I think about food, it’s usually in the context of “what am I going to make for dinner” or gnashing my teeth in irritation about coworkers evangelizing about their latest fad diets. Food is a huge part …

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Jun 06

Book Review — Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City

Evicted: Poverty and Profit in the American City by Matthew Desmond This book has a lot to recommend it. It’s generally the type of non-fiction I love reading: well researched, first-hand information about people I don’t know much about (and would like to understand.) Desmond has done a mountain of research for this book, much …

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Jan 06

Book Review: The Triple Package

The Triple Package: How Three Unlikely Traits Explain the Rise and Fall of Cultural Groups in America by Amy Chua This isn’t a terrible book, but it’s not spectacular either. On one hand, Chua and Rubenfeld put into simple words something I inherently understood but had never said out loud before: Insecurity, a sense of …

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May 29

Book Review: Reading Classes

Reading Classes: On Culture and Classism in America by Barbara Jensen I bought this book after attending a panel and workshop presented by the author at a con, and I was so hungry to learn more that I bought her book. Class in America is a subject that we don’t like to talk about. In …

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